Bushcraft for Children


Bushcraft and wild camping

Touching the Earth - The kids'll love it!

A great way to start the Christmas holidays and get out in the woods.

Touching the Earth – Fire and Shelter day

13th December

Two of the most important priorities when living outdoors to ensure you are warm and comfortable are shelter and fire.

On the Natural Pathways Fire and Shelter day, the whole family will build your very own shelter using just what the woodland provides. A great way to get the kids outdoors and a bit of nature under the fingernails. You’ll also learn how to light a roaring fire and keep it going – without matches!

If you fancy going down to the woods – you can find more details here.

Oh, and watch out for the bears!!!

[Teddy bears that is :)]

Direct experience of nature promotes sustainable lifestyles

Direct experience of nature promotes sustainable lifestyles

“…empowering individuals to restore and maintain the Earth’s natural systems, it also supports the well-being of future generations by promoting sustainable lifestyles.” John Aquilina

The most sustainable lifestyle is to live completely with the land, an integrated part of this wild system we call nature. But we can’t all run off and live in the woods (as much as I’d like to!). To save the world, we need to save ourselves first. And to save ourselves – we need to get outside and play. (more…)

Night Fire SparksAwakening the senses to feel the energy and power of nature is not a prerequisite of the Natural Pathways Bushcraft courses, but quite often it’s an inevitable result. (more…)

Natural Pathways WoodsThe Family Bushcraft Weekend at Natural Pathways has been designed to give a taste of survival living while increasing your connection to nature. And that’s exactly what it did for 15 Bushcrafters in July. It seems every part of the weekend was enjoyed by the six adults and nine children – everything that is except the toilet! (more…)

Children benefit from BushcraftAs a child I spent most of my time outdoors. In the days just before the IT explosion, playing out was the most necessary extra-curricular activity. We roamed streets and fields, woods and streams, explorers or scientists trekking through the suburban jungle; stalking beasts’ footprints in the sand each summer at the beach; searching for crabs and other exotic creatures in the rock pools.

A large school field at the back became our ‘everything’; our football pitch, pirate ship, scientific expedition. It was as full during the summer holidays as it was through term-time. We convinced ourselves we’d found clusters of 4 leaf-clover and spent weeks staring at the soil and tiny plants and the minute creatures that live in our earth. But children and young people play differently to 30 years ago. (more…)